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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
community of people sharing cars. that lets us find great cars, educate the owners, educate the renters, and ensure there is the right balance and variety of cars. if you look on the site in san francisco, you will literally see cars all over the place. it is all over the bay area. you are seeing cars sharing happening in places it never had before. we worked with the city to see if there were any ways we could get out the word. we hope to work with existing programs or be added as an additional transportation solution. in general, we like to involve the city and city leaders in our announcement of coming to market, and it has been working really well. >> i know you have community managers all over the globe. what's going on there? >> airbnb goes to network effects. we are all over in -- we are already in 19 cities all over the world. we just provide the tools on line, and local residents throughout the world decide they want to be part of the movement and part of airbnb and list their homes on the site, and local travelers decide they want to go somewhere and look for those. the amazi
know. with that being said, it's vitally important that those parents still have a say in the education of their children. i would certainly support and promote voting by those parents in school board elections in san francisco. by implication own a community college election would fit in that rubric, to support college advancement to people who have traditionally been put at the margins of our society. in those two elections, i think, are the most fundamental in the sense that they go to the root of advancement in this country and the obtaining of the american dream. so the school board and community college board i would certainly support that. >> thank you, miss olague. >> i don't think there is much to add to that. i know a couple of years ago there was a ballot measure that failed. so i would totally support bringing this back and allowing people to reconsider it. because as mr. everett said, i think it is important for people, especially those who have children in the school district and also students at the city college level to be able to weigh in on those types of questions.
measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or elimin
'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. called gutty, sc >>> hey, the giants 2010, they were built with so-called misfits. 2012? we'll see. got a minute? i do. here we go. dusty baker, still a very popular man in san francisco. getting love from will clark. the regular giants will be playing tomorrow. >> we'll see if they still love me on sunday. nothing better than me trying to figure out how to kick my butt and he's trying to figure out how to kick mine. >> atlanta chasing st. louis. two on, one out. i got it, i got it, you take it. oops. so the runners advance. the braves think okay, great, bases loaded. one trouble. they call the infield fly roll and that is how the fans reacted. threing bear cans, braves, braves end up losing 6-3. >> the orioles take out texas. 5-1 the final. >> what a crash and burn. >> see you at 11:00.
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
the educational experience of all pupils. >> caller: that's good. i guess it goes back to the case the was deemed moot anyway, but the fact of the matter is when you are laying on that table and you are about to have brain surgery, it doesn't matter what color the surgeon is. i don't care if he is black, white, it doesn't make any difference. the fact of the matter is if they were granted admission to school simply based on the fact of their skin color, that in itself is discriminatory. >> host: okay. carroll. oklahoma city. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i would say that i hope [inaudible] they don't intervene because that affirmative action of white women versus african-american women for jobs and positions and i think it is being used in that respect. hopefully the supreme court will step down and allow it to continue as it is. >> host: okay. new hampshire. the democratic call. good morning, now three. what are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among
the first question i went to princeton university i hope these guys are good to be well-educated and know something and the first question is where is your tomahawk? the borderland follows me everywhere. there was no way to escape it. the only way through it and so i realized there are not that -- i wouldn't be the barometer by which a lot of people what, you know, understand or judge native people so i realize the importance of my work and that her presentation. >> one of the things i like about your book is balance and that's important that type of community based upon balance but in the book we had a lot of balance, we balance the topics dealing with sensitive issues that might be sensitive to a non-native person like mike cherokee grandmother was a cherokee princess for the tribal community for enrollment and then you dealt with tough issues like the history of christopher columbus so there's a history lesson and then the ler enjoyment of reading the book. how did you decide what to include and what not to include in this book? >> guest: writing the book happened faster than my resear
on banks and insurance companies. we cannot got our investments on education, clean energy, research, technology. that is not a plan to grow the economy. that is not change. we have been there. we have tried that. we are not going back. we are moving forward. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] look -- we have got a different view about how you bring jobs and prosperity to america. the strong economy does not trickle down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class, and folks working hard to get into the middle-class. i think it is time our tax code stopped rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas. let us reward small businesses and manufacturing here in ohio, products made in america. that is the choice in this election. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more of our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards. by the middle of the next decade, your cars and trucks would go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today, the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decade
removed a bullet from the injured schoolgirl and education rights campaigner malala yousafzai. the 14-year-old was shot in the head on tuesday on her way home from school in the northwest region. the taliban, will pose girls attending school, have said they carried out the attack. for more on this story we can speak to the bbc's aleem maqbool ashais on his way to push war. >> we are just outside the combined military office, which is where she is being treated. we have spoken to one of her cousins who says that she is stable. a few hours after the attack on yesterday the situation became very critical and there were very worried. but there was an operation overnight and the bullet was removed. for the time being it does appear she is stable. doctors have been warning that she is not get out of danger. >> i have been reading there's been lots of condemnation of what took place. do you think this will have a wider effect on the way in which people view the taliban, on the way people view islamic extremism? >> there has been occasion where that has happened, where a particular case has galvan
't afford to gut our investments in education. or clean energy. or research. and technology. we can't afford to roll back regulations on wall street banks or oil companies or insurance companies. that is not a jobs plan. it's not a plan to grow our economy. it's sure not a plan to strengthen our middle class. we have been there. we have tried that. we're not going back. we are moving forward. we've got a different view about how we create jobs and prosperity in this country. [applause] this country doesn't just succeed when just a few are doing well at the top. succeed is when the middle lass gets bigger. our economy doesn't grow from the top down. it grows from the middle out. we don't -- we don't believe that anybody's entitled to success in this country. but we do believe in opportunity. we believe in a country where hard work pays off. and responsibility is rewarded. and everybody's getting a fair shot. and everybody's doing their fair share. and everybody's playing by the same rules. that's the country we believe in. that's what we've been fighting for for the last four years. that's wh
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
after the break. >>> still to come, guest host ken langone will cover the economy, candidates, education. and then this morning we'll invite you to "squawk box" office hours. a chance to talk with us on facebook. andrew will host today's session. check out our facebook page. >> getting a little air brushed. >> you'll beat the record for last time you did it. >>> "squawk box" is on facebook. like the show and get update, commentary, news and much more. add us to your pages and keep us with what's happening on the show. "squawk box" on facebook and cnbc. short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whateve
and accountability. i'm talking especially about his education reform and welfare reform and his police reforms. when they didn't work, their answer was always more money. but we have learned from experience the governments must focus on product that comes out of an agency, not on the tax revenue that goes into an agency. [applause] in new york city we have seen how accountability and innovation has led to transformation. in public safety, public education and public assistance. crime in new york city is down more than 30% compared to a decade ago and high school graduations are up 40% and welfare rolls are up 25%. that didn't just happen because i spend more money. it happened because accountability and innovation has become an integral part of the work. it's not easy. it never is. they will always be doomsayers. i also know that tough problems are not solved by an waving a magic wand and charting the right course rather than the easy course takes courage to the and i don't have any doubt that david cameron has the courage of the convictions and i believe that he is charting the right course from br
both of us. she is about 23 years old. she was educated at pepperdine university. she is working for "the daily caller." i want you to hear what she says from her perspective on journalism and get your reaction to it. >> i feel as though twitter and facebook have enabled people who maybe are not in the media and not have a loud voice to become one of the loudest voices in the media. we see people like matt drudge who has no connection to the media, is a political outsider, and look how far he has come. he took advantage and saw the potential of the new medium, the internet, internet journalism, and his voice is just as loud as the media establishment. >> reaction? >> appalled. i am appalled. i do not know quite what she thinks -- this is a good idea? >> she does. >> i think it is a dreadful idea. good journalism, good reporting must work in the constraints of great editing. it has to. i ran into trouble a few years ago, giving a speech at some award in canada. i was talking about so-called citizen journalism. i said i would trust it as much as i would trust the citizen survey. yo
and create jobs and helping environments. we do a tremendous amount for education and veterans. we have hired, and if you're a veteran in this room thank you very much for serving this country, we have hired 4800 veterans this year in the last 18 months or so. there is this thing called 100,000 jobs which we help starting hired 28,000 veterans and we have done 4500 ourselves. while other people are talking, we are doing. before this program we will do 1000 so we try to participate and to me it's all the same thing, healthy vibrant company, makes it all possible. the dying company, now been it is possible. i will put it in that same thing by the way, people say as an employee or shareholder if i don't make customers happy there is nothing else. if our employees don't do a good job -- it's all important to me. i try to run a fair profit, take care of your own people in your clients. let me go back to the mistake issue one more time. here's a question for you all. we have something like $15 billion in exposure in derivatives and hedging and bouncing around. you could easily tell me get it down.
political differences we were very close friends. >> reporter: davis sees his role as an educator, teaching members of congress about his clients' issues. >> the most important function a lobbyist provides is to provide facts and information. >> reporter: but first they have to get their foot in the door. >> hi, congressman, how are you? reporter: the business of lobbying is shrouded in secrecy. >> great to meet you. reporter: we were given rare access to the inner workings. including this networking event for lobbyists and their guests. >> i really specialize in technology and helping those small technology companies through the process. >> you find that champion for your cause and you ride that for all its worth. >> reporter: our cameras were allowed along on actual lobby visits, being conducted most any time congress is in session. davis is such a familiar face in the halls of the capitol, republican congresswoman mary bono mack greets him with a kiss. >> lobbyists trade on -- if you want to use the bad word -- trade on friendships. >> excuse me. this is a won woman. >> do i ever ask a f
a fourteenth century trading empire. is not an educational game -- you basically start with a little island and you have some crops can you can build it up and start trading with other islands and get well. to build a little town and basically you can play it as a warrior or a merchant and build up wealth and you have all these objectives. is incredibly complicated. at a certain points my kids wanted to build a cathedral. you got a certain amount of wealth and could build a cathedral so they wanted to which you this stage in the game. what you had to do to build a cathedral was that your population wealthy enough to afford it and have enough stone that you would mind to physically build a cathedral and have certain spices as part of your society that the elites would be happy enough to support building a cathedral which meant you had to have a big fleet of ships to get these which meant you had a military and naval fleet to protect those ships. when my eight-year-old and my 10-year-old for fun are sitting there trying to build this cathedral and thinking like a city mayor and thinking like
, different cultural developments happen, different models of education happen and, they have kind of surprising effects on those different kinds of intelligence, and so, when we, when we have a society with, you know, kind of tremendous explosion in technology, which causes us to have fewer face-to-face conversations or fewer conversations where we hear somebody else's voice, one of the risks is that emotional intelligence we have, the ability to kind of read, kind of emotional nuances of someone's tone for instance gets challenged because we're texting and tweeting and sending short little e-mails to each other. we don't have the full rich experience of face to facial expressions which are a huge part of human communications. we sacrifice some of our emotional intelligence to get other kinds of intelligence, problem solving intelligence, the ability to understand complex systems which is something technology helps us quite a bit. so in that book, i was trying to give larger, and more optimistic portrait of where technology and popular culture was taking us in terms of our brains.
an education and she's 14 years old shot in the head by the taliban and trying to silence women and young girls and she deserves the peace prize and i will see this, the euro-weenies who give out the nobel peace prize to the eu, it's not as appalling as when they gave it to yasser arafat and barack obama after being president for-- >> can i say this about that, eu getting the nobel peace prize is like praising your drug addicted kid for showing up for school every day, it's beside the point. the eu is about to go into a huge depression, everything is going i don't think, not right, they don't deserve a nobel peace prize. stuart: why did they give it to them. what's the motivation? i don't get it. >> if i could explain it i would. you went through the track record who they've given the prize to in the past. stuart: i want to go back to the 14-year-old pakistani girl. if anybody deserved it, that brave young woman. and do you know that the taliban have been dumping bodies around her parents' house as a warning to that girl. stop what you're doing. stop supporting education for females, dumping bo
comprehensive school education. so, britain gave me, gave my family, a great gift that my parents never had. a safe and secure childhood. and you know my parents didn't talk much about their early lives, it was too painful, it hurt too much. the pain of those they lost. the guilt of survivors. but i believe that their experience meant they brought up both david and myself differently as a result. because having struggled for life itself, they instilled in us a sense of duty to ease the struggles of others. and this came not just from my parents' wartime experience it came from the daily fabric of our childhood. you know there were toys and games, rows about homework. i was actually a dallas fan, believe it or not, which didn't go down well with my dad as you can imagine. so of course there were the normal things, but every upbringing is special, and mine was special because of the place of politics within it. when i was twelve years old, i met a south african friend of my parents, her name was ruth first. the image i remember is of somebody vivacious, full of life, full of laughter. and the
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> john tower, let's do three e-mails to day. three e-mails. how about that? i tied you into it now. >> that sounds like a great idea. cat writes, nightmare woke me up. willie was a stunt double. don't want to know what was the stunt. >> daniel tosh. we'll have to get a side b
to get girls education. the local government is offering a $104,000 award for information leading to her attackers but she does remain in critical condition. mark phillips is in london with her story. good morning. >> reporter: the latest medical bulletin on malala yousufzai's condition is she's still critical, still unconscious, and still on a ventilator and doctors removed a bullet lodged near her spine and moving her to another hospital with better critical care facilities. >> chances are for several days. fairly good chances. >> reporter: it's been two days since the taliban in pakistan tried to kill malala yousufzai. and kill her dream of equal education rights for girls. she's clinging to life. and judging from the reaction of men and women so does her dream. she was a prime target for the taliban who don't think women should have any rights. it's this kind of talk they try to silence. >> they can't stop me. i'll get my education if it's at home, school or any place. save our schools, save our pakistan. >> reporter: local pakistani officials in the swat valley where malala yousufza
. this week, lou's been thinking about who's watching. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> who's watching? on a trip to london, i ran across an interesting newspaper feature called on a typical day in london. it described how many advertisements you would see. how many of those black taxis would pass you, how much you would likely spend on parking and such. one statistic really got my attention: on an average day, you will be on camera 300 times. we're not talking on camera like the one i'm on right now, we're talking security cameras. then, just the other day, my wife and i were having breakfast out at one of those ubiquitous coffee places, a woman came by with one of the most unusual baby strollers i'd ever seen. i commented to her that it was really quite wonderful and before i could finish she blurted, i know you! you spoke at our conference last friday. it reminded me of a great piece of advice i got years ago when i an old friend said, just remember, you're always under your people are watching you like hawks every day to see if your actions match your words. it really do
education project at the museum. he writes and speaks extensively on religious liberty and religion in american public life. at the end of the table is dan mack, director of the aclu's program, freedom of religion and belief. he evades a wide range of religious liberty litigation, advocacy and efforts nationwide. prior to his work, he was a partner in the up says first amendment law. so what i'm going to do is try to keep this kind of a conversation. so i'll just ask a general question in each of you can answer it and respond to each other as well. with so much we want to cover. first, blistery general historical perspective. how does the state of religious freedom, but which i mean the ability of all americans to their faith compare to say 20 or 50 or 100 years ago? where are we today? maybe we could start at the end of the table and were closer to me. >> first, thanks for having us all here. we appreciate this opportunity. i've spoken to many of you many times in the past. as for the historical perspective, first i just want to say one thing about the terms religious freedom. it i
. and the role of women in society was changing rapidly. my friends, educator with traditional values but a deep sense of personal ambition, wanted to know how to be true to ourselves, yet remain committed to our husbands and our children. as a young mother i had stumbled into a bookstore and told gift from the sea off of the bargain shelf. it's author was struggling with the very same questions that we were asking ourselves. her answers were deceptively simple, and yet they ring true. and i wanted to know how this woman got so smart. and so, rising before dawn, i climbed the stairs to my third floor room. yes, dear virginia, a room of my own, to read lindbergh's work, to study its historical framework, and to jot down my thoughts before sending my children off to school. my biography of and lindbergh would take more than 10 years to complete. during which i had the rare privilege of meeting her. 10 times. but the book was more than a biography. it was a journey towards self-knowledge, during which i developed a consuming interest in understanding the lives of women. not only women thinkers, but
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] >>> welcome back. i'm victor blackwell. we're about 27 minutes in to our tour around the world. up next, you cannot see much, so just listens. [ gunfire ] >> this is a firefight from overnight near an air force compound outside syria's capital. opposition groups say two huge car bombs exploded in that area. and we have video of intense fighting outside of damascus. tank just moving through the streets. activists say at least 31 people were killed across the country today, most victims found burned and their bodies have not been identified. >>> a man who says he saw the inner workings of the syrian are a geem has fled t
. they apply the worldwide economics of the labor market place to your value. a poorly educated semi motivated american worker is not a very valuable commodity on the world market. that is the problem. if he went the economy to improve -- if you want the economy to approve, we need to be nationalists -- global financial dominance is what is killing us. the investor class is ruining the worker class of america. host: 4 you yourself, has your idea of the american dream changed in the last couple of years? caller: i have been very fortunate. i would say it has. i am much more cynical now. there seems to be a minority of americans that believe the most important thing in the world is to get rich as soon as they can and they do not care how they do it. that is killing 80% of the american workers in this country. host: mary, where are you calling us from? caller: illinois. from what i heard from the last caller, i a greed. we cannot expect to be forever the super power most important person in the whole universe. we have to be part of the world and deal with what is out there. it is changing. host:
the president -- in educate the gateway to opportunity. [cheering and applause] across our most beautiful state, we have an abundance of sun and wind and geothermal. that's why i stand up and fight for our clean energy entrepreneurs and workers who are making nevada the clean energy jobs capital of the united states of america. [cheering and applause] and when it comes to our seniors, who have worked so hard their entire lives, i stand up and i fight so when they retire, we can have dignity and peace of mind knowing that their medicare and social security will be there for them in future generations. [cheering and applause] education, energy, veteran's benefits, medicare, social security, along with women's rights and welcome is what -- [cheering and applause] that's is what is at stake this november. on issue after issue president obama is moving us forward by rebuilding an economy that ensures that all americans who work hard, play by the rules, students, parents, hard-working men and women in nevada can build economic security and live the american dream. [cheering and applause] president ob
will likely affect their grade and future education, and they say the mints they ate are perfectly legal. it all started when 17-year-old jake walker took these to school. >> i don't feel that i should lose my education over a little mint. >> reporter: they are caffein-in mints, perfectly legal, but to some school officials in pekin illinois they looked like drugs. jake and three of his friends were suspended for eating the mints during lunch. >> this is 2012, and caffein is caffein. i drink soda. jake drinks soda. i didn't see anything wrong with a caffein pill. >> reporter: school officials issued this statement. pekin community high school approaches consumption of mood-altering substances very seriously given both the health risks at issue and a mission to keep both illegal and legal drugs and substances out of the school. >> i see people bringing in energy drinks and coffee to school every day, so i thought, hey, it's healthier. why not dry to bring it in and maybe get a little bit more energy. >> reporter: here's a caffein breakdown. a 16-ounce cup of coffee averages 100 milligrams
talk and move forward from. this this is the subject of education. listen. >> when he tells a student that you know, you should borrow money from your parents to go to college, you know, that indicates the degree to which, you know, there may not be as much as a focus. >> mr. president, you are entitled, mr. president to your own airplane and house but not to your own facts. i'm not going to cut education funding. i don't have any plan to cut. >> so respond to that. why do you think governor romney did so well? >> >> i think he was a lot sharper than the president was. governor romney got on offense early this the debate. he framed the debate in a way that it was very clear to the public what exactly he was trying to accomplish. throughout the debate he portrayed two paths one that the president has the country on and one that he would put the country on. that's exactly what he needed to do. he needed to go after the president on the economy. but he also needed to cast vision for where he would take the country. i thought that was imminently clear on wednesday night. >>e said mitt rom
education coverage for kids. so in the basic level. and of course we are creating jobs. probably we need to pay better those jobs but the fact is there. so migration-- migration reaches 0 rate in 2011, 2010 and probably 2012. now it is clear for me that these comprehensive immigration reform is absolutely required. and probably this is the window of opportunity to do that. y? because there is not such pressure in political field with immigration. we are stopping the mexican migration. and we can, or the american congress should consider that reform. that leave the people from the shadows, president obama say, i do believe on that and it could be very good for both country, not only for mexican workers but also for american society, that demand the services of the mexican people. >> rose: president calderon, thank you for joining us. pleasure to have you here. felipe calderon. >> google has changed the way we search, the way we use e-mail, the way we use maps and mobile technology. now it wants to disrupt the world of venture capital. founded in 2009 google ventures aims to maj 80 to 100
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)

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